Know the Code

trails, etiquette, rules

Know the Code

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EJ Porth

A few rules for Bozeman area trails.

We’re pretty lucky to have the 80-mile Main Street to the Mountains trail system right outside our back door. From campus, you can get downtown or to the top of a mountain—the options are endless. Bikers, runners, dog owners, commuters, and walkers keep the trails busy, making it everyone’s responsibility to follow the rules so we can care for our community trails and respect fellow users. Being a good trail user is a big deal here in Bozeman. Nothing gets you more glares and frustrated sighs than bad trail etiquette. But don’t worry—we’ll give you the lowdown on how to fit in and do your part. Here’s what you can do to be an A+ trail user.  

Obey the posted signs and trail regulations. If a trail is closed, it’s closed for a reason. If a sign tells you to slow down on your bike, hit the brakes.

Stay on the trail. It might seem like a good idea to take a shortcut between switchbacks, but this can actually create serious damage to the trail. We need to respect the natural areas around the trail as well. On that note, don’t pick the flowers.

Don’t bike or walk on the muddy trails. Especially In the springtime, using muddy trails can cause serious damage and may require significant repair later on. Follow some of the Bozeman trail conditions on Facebook to see what trails are dry and ready to use.

Stay right on the trail. Just like when you’re driving, pass on the left.

Don’t litter. Duh.

If you’re a biker, yield to walkers. They have right of way. Slow down, use a bell, or call out “On your left!” before passing.

Downhill bike riders yield to uphill bike riders. It’s safer and easier for everyone.

If you bring a dog, PICK UP THE POOP! There are dog-poop stations with bags and trash cans all along the trail system. Don’t just pick it up and leave the bag on the side of the trail. You’ll forget about it. Ignoring your dog’s poop will bring very bad trail karma your way.

Obey leash rules. You’re representing all dog owners—help us look good. And no, your dog is not an exception to the rule because it’s “really well-behaved.” We all think that about our dogs, but it isn’t always true.

Pick up a Main Street to the Mountains trail map at the Gallatin Valley Land Trust office (212 S. Wallace, #102) or at local retailers.


EJ Porth is the communications and outreach manager for the Gallatin Valley Land Trust.

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