Astronomy

Jim Manning
Western mythos is filled with rootin’, tootin’, straight-shootin’ cowboys—ridin’, ropin’, wranglin’ and rough-housin’ their way into the stuff of legend. The ancient Greeks would have appreciated the type, for they had their equivalents, some of whom are memorialized in the sky. Read more >>
Jim Manning
No figure of the Old West is more iconic than the gunfighter—the lone wolf with the tortured soul, traversing a hostile landscape, selling his skills to the highest bidder for “a few dollars more.” The figures of the sky predated firearms, so nobody up there is packing. Read more >>
Manning, Jim
Black birds circling the sky are a common Western motif. But if they’re flapping more than soaring, it’s not buzzards you spy, in all likelihood, but the ubiquitous raven, or its cousin the crow. Read more >>
Manning, Jim
There were the Youngers. And the Doolins. And who could forget Frank and Jesse James? In the Wild West, brothers had a way of becoming notorious. It’s no different in the sky, where another set of brothers—the Gemini boys—ride high every winter’s night. Read more >>
Manning, Jim
The Wild and Woolly West of (mostly) bygone days was so-called for a reason, for it could also be hazardous. There was danger of fever, rattlesnake bite, broken bones, and the occasional bout of lead poisoning, for which the frontier doctor came in mighty handy. Read more >>
Manning, Jim
Ah, spring! The season when Tennyson said a young man’s fancy “lightly turns to thoughts of love.” But for the region’s grizzly bears, newly roused from their winter’s fast, love can wait. It’s all about getting a good meal. Read more >>
Manning, Jim
Montana’s horse-and-buggy days are long over, the buckboards and freight wagons of frontier days have been replaced by today’s 4x4 pickup for hauling modern Westerners and their gear. Read more >>
Manning, Jim
In the West, triangles have a certain “Come and get it!” quality, as any hungry cowpoke at the end of a long day can tell you: the clang of the metal triangle—the dinner bell from the chuckwagon--was music to his stomach. Read more >>
Manning, Jim
No rip-snortin’, self-respectin’ Western movie would be without them. Our cowboy hero, his horse shot out from underneath him, one cartridge left in his six-gun and one swallow in his canteen, staggers across the burning desert landscape toward the next waterhole. And what circles above? Read more >>
Manning, Jim
The perfect cast, the cutthroat rises to the hand-tied fly, and the battle royal ensues. Such is the drama of fish versus fisher, playing out on countless mountain streams in Big Sky Country through the long, lazy summer and the earliest chills of autumn. Read more >>
Jim Manning
There’s no time like summertime to celebrate American icons—Mom, apple pie, and the flag mixed with lemonade on the back porch, fireworks on the Fourth, Old Faithful spouting in Yellowstone, and of course, that national symbol: the bald eagle, gazing steely-eyed from some lofty perch. Read more >>
Manning, Jim
In the West, designating ownership has always been a straightforward affair: you own it, you brand it. Letters and shapes emblazoned on countless bovine rumps told a rancher what was his—and earned many a careless rustler an appointment with a rope. Read more >>
Manning, Jim
Whether you’re a saddle-weary cowpoke or a wilderness adventurer, there seems to be one gastronomical truth about the Western mythos of outdoor living: at the end of a long, hard day on the range, the ridge, or the river, no Western campfire would seem complete without its coffee pot, ready to ta Read more >>
Manning, Jim
Among the original settler folk of the Wild West, women were a demographic in short supply compared to the male cowpunchers, sodbusters, gold-seekers, and adventurers that filtered into the high plains and Northern Rockies in the 1800s. Read more >>
Manning, Jim
Spring is a sometimes season in Montana—sometimes we get it, sometimes we don’t. Such are the vagaries of a mountain climate, where the weather pays scant attention to the astronomical milestones of solstice or equinox. Read more >>
Jim Manning
Montana—in a normal winter—is nothing if not cold. Snow drapes the mountains like a powdery blanket, the air is sharp and brittle, and even the stars huddle together for warmth. Just look at the Pleiades and you’ll see what I mean. Read more >>
Manning, Jim
Whether you prowl the winter landscape in snowshoes, skis, or your favorite pack boots, look skyward whenever your adventures keep you outside at nightfall. You’ll find a fellow sportsman in the heavens in the glittering figure of the constellation Orion, the hunter. Read more >>
Jim Manning
When hiking the mountains and meadows of summertime Montana, it's always good to watch your step'lest you encounter the occasional bison or moose patty or one of the rodents, snakes, lizards, or other creepy-crawlies that inhabit the various terrains of the region. Read more >>
Manning, Jim
Ah, spring! The time of year when robins return and gophers peep their heads out of their winter burrows with their little brains turned to thoughts of romance. Read more >>
Manning, Jim
Winter's bracing air and muffling blanket of snow may send the grizzly into its seasonal coma, but for outdoors lovers, it simply means a change of gear. Read more >>
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