Birds

 

Bozeman's no South Dakota, but we do have a few pheasants and plenty of huns. Grouse is our game – ruffed and blue, mainly. And it's a long season for these mountain birds: early September to the end of December. So grab your gun, unleash the dog, and get a-walkin'.

Carty, Dave
I’d just finished filling the tank in my pickup when I heard the unmistakable chirp of a Hungarian Partridge, technically known as the gray partridge. It sounded like the rusty squeak of a gate hinge. Read more >>
Dehmer, Kurt
For many outdoorsfolk, autumn can be a conundrum. With the plethora of possibilities and opportunities in this blessed corner of the Treasure State, choosing a starting point can be overwhelming. For starters, head for the bridges and ridges of Madison County. Bridges Read more >>
England, Mike
Hunting the Coffee Creek BMA Read more >>
Mike England
The best base camp for hunters exploring the Fort Benton area is the Grand Union Hotel. Perched on the bank of the Missouri River, this historic inn dates back to the late 1800s, when Fort Benton was the last stop for steamboats traveling into Montana territory. Read more >>
Muennich, Pete
One beautiful spring weekend last year, I opted to head east to hunt down some Merriam turkeys. I had recently gotten permission from a friend at school to hunt his family ranch along the Yellowstone. Read more >>
England, Mike
Fanning out across the field, a dog in front of each of us, we move slowly, deliberately, through the hayfield’s saffron stubble. It’s late morning in the lower Madison Valley; the sky is clear and bright, with a cool, persistent breeze. Perfect hunting weather. Read more >>
Dehmer, Kurt
As pursuits go there is nothing that turns the proverbial crank quite like a hunt. But alas, spring is not usually considered the season for such things. Although this may be the case, and aside from the hibernation-thinned bruin, nothing considered big game is in season. Read more >>
Kurt Dehmer
Chasing Montana's largest bird. Read more >>
Skinner, Dallas
On the river it is still dark, but above the canyon rim the starlings catch the dawn. At first they are three separate flocks, but as I watch they merge into two, then one. Like a formation of fighter jets, they dive and bank and climb in perfect synchronicity. Read more >>
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